Notes: Bow Nigger

[Article in Question]

The ritual of bowing your opponent in show of respect, or showing any respect to someone you’re about to kill is an interesting one in history and fiction. Kung Fu movies propagate this, althought I’m not aware of such rituals actually being true in the “battlefield”, yet when I was a practitioner of Wing Chun, the ritual was commonplace, to show respect, to the Sifu (master), the peers at the start/end of interaction or session, or as a simple greeting, so regardless whether it was time to fight or not.
It is interesting how contextual the gesture is. To Sifu, it would be acknowledgement of Sifu’s superiority and show of respect, but to sparring partners, it would be a simple acknowledgement, if not a statement that the other is equal, or a mere greeting or “thank you” at the start/end of sparring or drill.

A quote from Ender’s Game comes to mind to contextualize the more philosophical meaning of showing respect to your opponent:

In the moment when I truly understand my enemy, understand him well enough to defeat him, then in that very moment I also love him. I think it’s impossible to really understand somebody, what they want, what they believe, and not love them the way they love themselves. And then, in that very moment when I love them…. I destroy them.Orson Scott Card, Ender’s Game

Jedi Knight game, has no mechanics in place, or no incentive for the players to perform the ritual, however players do so, is it out of respect for each other, or is it simply a role-play gesture to make the world set out by G. Lucas relivable, to one up the game’s developers at making it that much closer to the fiction?

Similar thought comes about Journey. The game has no ability to communicate with another player apart from the “chirp”, yet players find their way around, communicating with each other through flight, movement, length of and pauses between chirps, scarf play and meditation gesture, to indicate desire for attention, flight recharge, or celebration of each others glory.

Is it the “you and me” / “you vs. me” aspect of desire for binding ritual, that pushes people to act them out despite the limitations of a given system?
Similar to a yong male challenging another to a pretend slow motion fist fight, one would take up a fighting stance, and wait for the other to “clue in” and take up his own stance before engagement in the play, as a way of communicating, within the fictional play-space when one cannot simply say out loud “I’m going to pretend fight you”, which would destroy this Matrix-esque scenario.

My glossary:
Defiance